The U.S. Constitution — is it dead or dying?

History has shown that republics last on average about 200 years.  The United State is a republic underpinned by a Constitution.   As we stand today, that constitution is defunct.

Here’s why:

  • In Congress a large and powerful government agency has been found full of corruption.   That agency is the Internal Revenue Service.  Lois Lerner an IRS operative in Cincinnati, OH, may be at the center of some of it.
  • Lerner repeatedly evokes the Fifth Amendment and refuses to answer question, thus preventing the investigation to proceed.
  • Congress which has the Constitutional authority could find her in contempt but President Barack Obama’s Justice Department under the leadership of Eric Holder would have to prosecute her.
  • There is little chance that the Obama regime’s prosecutorial arm would reveal corruption inside itself.
  • The courts are powerless without the justice department
Constitutional toilet paper?

Constitutional toilet paper?

Meanwhile POTUS governs by fiat.   The representative democracy that was given checks and balances has been wadded up and thrown in the trash.  Right now the Constitution is simply a museum piece.

Most dismaying is that after 150 years and a civil war that cost a half million lives, some radicals talking about session.  What does that say?  That many don’t expect that would be the kind of compromising that made the Constitution a workable document.

This blogger remembers Ronald Reagan, who was elected along with a Democrat controlled House of Representative and a slim majority in the Senate.   Reagan proceeded to negotiate with the House members and formed a coalition of Democrats and Republicans.  That coalition formed a majority that passed Reagan’s program and turned a deep recession into prosperity.  That’s the way a republic should work.  That is the way the founding fathers envisioned that a republic should work.

That has been lost and along with it the fundamental document that it all depended on.

 

 

Tea Party senator digs in against talk of compromise – USA TODAY

WASHINGTON — The political action committee founded by Sen. Jim DeMint, a darling of the Tea Party movement, was three-for-nine in picking conservative Senate candidates this year — after spending more than $8.7 million.

Of the nine Republican Senate candidates that received money from the Senate Conservatives Fund, only Ted Cruz of Texas, Jeff Flake of Arizona, and Deb Fischer of Nebraska won election on Tuesday.

Those three and the six losing candidates benefited from some of the $16.5 million raised by the fund and an affiliated super PAC over the 2011-2012 election cycle, said Matt Hoskins, the fund’s executive director.

Despite the fund’s less-than-stellar record, DeMint and Hoskins are urging supporters to resist calls for moderation.

USA TODAY.